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#BeamMeUpScotty
2017-07-02 18:28:05 UTC
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Maybe just 2. You said you barely got out of high school. And
peanut speaks like he's in junior high school which means he
may have just received a
rudimentary equation in physics involving the **FORCE** of
gravity which he claims is acceleration. What a dummy.
How strong is the **FORCE** of gravity on the surface of
the earth?
You still haven't answered that.
On Earth, gravity gives weight to physical objects and causes the ocean
tides. The force of Earth's gravity is the result of the planets mass
and density – 5.97237 ? 1024 kg (1.31668?1025 lbs) and 5.514 g/cm3,
respectively. This results in Earth having a gravitational strength of
9.8 m/s? close to the surface (also known as 1 g), which naturally
decreases the farther away one is from the surface.
Mass attracts mass, but if there were no external mass and the earth
were the only mass in the universe and it being a steel ball bearing it
would NOT be attracting anything to it, so would it still be that mass
is creating gravity with no external mass for it to react with ?

Can you measure gravity without a mass to show you it is attracting
something, so doesn't gravity require two separate entities with mass
for gravity to exist?
--
That's Karma
Just Wondering
2017-07-02 22:00:28 UTC
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Post by #BeamMeUpScotty
snipped
Maybe just 2. You said you barely got out of high school. And
peanut speaks like he's in junior high school which means he
may have just received a
rudimentary equation in physics involving the **FORCE** of
gravity which he claims is acceleration. What a dummy.
How strong is the **FORCE** of gravity on the surface of
the earth?
You still haven't answered that.
On Earth, gravity gives weight to physical objects and causes the ocean
tides. The force of Earth's gravity is the result of the planets mass
and density – 5.97237 ? 1024 kg (1.31668?1025 lbs) and 5.514 g/cm3,
respectively. This results in Earth having a gravitational strength of
9.8 m/s? close to the surface (also known as 1 g), which naturally
decreases the farther away one is from the surface.
Mass attracts mass, but if there were no external mass and the earth
were the only mass in the universe and it being a steel ball bearing it
would NOT be attracting anything to it, so would it still be that mass
is creating gravity with no external mass for it to react with ?
Can you measure gravity without a mass to show you it is attracting
something, so doesn't gravity require two separate entities with mass
for gravity to exist?
The earth isn't a single mass. It's made up of atoms, which are made up
of protons, neutrons and electrons and other subatomic stuff. Most of
those particles has its own mass. But even considering only atoms, there
are about 1.3 x 10^50 separate gravity sources that make up the earth.
https://www.quora.com/How-many-atoms-are-in-the-earth-and-everything-in-it
#BeamMeUpScotty
2017-07-03 17:51:12 UTC
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Post by Just Wondering
Post by #BeamMeUpScotty
snipped
Maybe just 2. You said you barely got out of high school. And
peanut speaks like he's in junior high school which means he
may have just received a
rudimentary equation in physics involving the **FORCE** of
gravity which he claims is acceleration. What a dummy.
How strong is the **FORCE** of gravity on the surface of
the earth?
You still haven't answered that.
On Earth, gravity gives weight to physical objects and causes the ocean
tides. The force of Earth's gravity is the result of the planets mass
and density – 5.97237 ? 1024 kg (1.31668?1025 lbs) and 5.514 g/cm3,
respectively. This results in Earth having a gravitational strength of
9.8 m/s? close to the surface (also known as 1 g), which naturally
decreases the farther away one is from the surface.
Mass attracts mass, but if there were no external mass and the earth
were the only mass in the universe and it being a steel ball bearing it
would NOT be attracting anything to it, so would it still be that mass
is creating gravity with no external mass for it to react with ?
Can you measure gravity without a mass to show you it is attracting
something, so doesn't gravity require two separate entities with mass
for gravity to exist?
The earth isn't a single mass. It's made up of atoms, which are made up
of protons, neutrons and electrons and other subatomic stuff. Most of
those particles has its own mass. But even considering only atoms, there
are about 1.3 x 10^50 separate gravity sources that make up the earth.
https://www.quora.com/How-many-atoms-are-in-the-earth-and-everything-in-it
Then imagine one atom and whether it creates gravity or does it require
two, do they mutually attract or is one enough to create gravity?

Considering that one mass has no reaction and it requires two to create
the "gravity" then one is ONLY have the equation isn't it?

And when you look at it from all sides it's NOT creating a curve in
space it's creating a hole in the time space wave and gravity is either
a result of the hole or it's NOT there until there is another hole in
the time/space for it to react with.

You can breathe but if you're in a vacuum, breathing is NOT real is it?
there is no breathing there, so with only one atom of mass there would
be no there there for gravity to be there. There would be a half
gravity or a "grav" with no "ity" and unless it's connected it's NOTHING.
--
That's Karma
Just Wondering
2017-07-03 21:51:24 UTC
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Post by #BeamMeUpScotty
Post by Just Wondering
Post by #BeamMeUpScotty
snipped
Maybe just 2. You said you barely got out of high school. And
peanut speaks like he's in junior high school which means he
may have just received a
rudimentary equation in physics involving the **FORCE** of
gravity which he claims is acceleration. What a dummy.
How strong is the **FORCE** of gravity on the surface of
the earth?
You still haven't answered that.
On Earth, gravity gives weight to physical objects and causes the ocean
tides. The force of Earth's gravity is the result of the planets mass
and density – 5.97237 ? 1024 kg (1.31668?1025 lbs) and 5.514 g/cm3,
respectively. This results in Earth having a gravitational strength of
9.8 m/s? close to the surface (also known as 1 g), which naturally
decreases the farther away one is from the surface.
Mass attracts mass, but if there were no external mass and the earth
were the only mass in the universe and it being a steel ball bearing it
would NOT be attracting anything to it, so would it still be that mass
is creating gravity with no external mass for it to react with ?
Can you measure gravity without a mass to show you it is attracting
something, so doesn't gravity require two separate entities with mass
for gravity to exist?
The earth isn't a single mass. It's made up of atoms, which are made up
of protons, neutrons and electrons and other subatomic stuff. Most of
those particles has its own mass. But even considering only atoms, there
are about 1.3 x 10^50 separate gravity sources that make up the earth.
https://www.quora.com/How-many-atoms-are-in-the-earth-and-everything-in-it
Then imagine one atom and whether it creates gravity or does it require
two, do they mutually attract or is one enough to create gravity?
Considering that one mass has no reaction and it requires two to create
the "gravity" then one is ONLY have the equation isn't it?
And when you look at it from all sides it's NOT creating a curve in
space it's creating a hole in the time space wave and gravity is either
a result of the hole or it's NOT there until there is another hole in
the time/space for it to react with.
You can breathe but if you're in a vacuum, breathing is NOT real is it?
there is no breathing there, so with only one atom of mass there would
be no there there for gravity to be there. There would be a half
gravity or a "grav" with no "ity" and unless it's connected it's NOTHING.
If all the universe contained was one fundamental particle, there would
be no one around to test the hypothesis.
#BeamMeUpScotty
2017-07-03 23:47:13 UTC
Permalink
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Post by Just Wondering
Post by #BeamMeUpScotty
Post by Just Wondering
Post by #BeamMeUpScotty
snipped
Maybe just 2. You said you barely got out of high school. And
peanut speaks like he's in junior high school which means he
may have just received a
rudimentary equation in physics involving the **FORCE** of
gravity which he claims is acceleration. What a dummy.
How strong is the **FORCE** of gravity on the surface of
the earth?
You still haven't answered that.
On Earth, gravity gives weight to physical objects and causes the ocean
tides. The force of Earth's gravity is the result of the planets mass
and density – 5.97237 ? 1024 kg (1.31668?1025 lbs) and 5.514 g/cm3,
respectively. This results in Earth having a gravitational strength of
9.8 m/s? close to the surface (also known as 1 g), which naturally
decreases the farther away one is from the surface.
Mass attracts mass, but if there were no external mass and the earth
were the only mass in the universe and it being a steel ball bearing it
would NOT be attracting anything to it, so would it still be that mass
is creating gravity with no external mass for it to react with ?
Can you measure gravity without a mass to show you it is attracting
something, so doesn't gravity require two separate entities with mass
for gravity to exist?
The earth isn't a single mass. It's made up of atoms, which are made up
of protons, neutrons and electrons and other subatomic stuff. Most of
those particles has its own mass. But even considering only atoms, there
are about 1.3 x 10^50 separate gravity sources that make up the earth.
https://www.quora.com/How-many-atoms-are-in-the-earth-and-everything-in-it
Then imagine one atom and whether it creates gravity or does it require
two, do they mutually attract or is one enough to create gravity?
Considering that one mass has no reaction and it requires two to create
the "gravity" then one is ONLY have the equation isn't it?
And when you look at it from all sides it's NOT creating a curve in
space it's creating a hole in the time space wave and gravity is either
a result of the hole or it's NOT there until there is another hole in
the time/space for it to react with.
You can breathe but if you're in a vacuum, breathing is NOT real is it?
there is no breathing there, so with only one atom of mass there would
be no there there for gravity to be there. There would be a half
gravity or a "grav" with no "ity" and unless it's connected it's NOTHING.
If all the universe contained was one fundamental particle, there would
be no one around to test the hypothesis.
The irony being that it wouldn't matter but it would tell you if gravity
is a one sided force of nature. Whether it exists on its own without a
need for a co-dependent force .
--
That's Karma
Just Wondering
2017-07-04 08:42:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by #BeamMeUpScotty
Post by Just Wondering
Post by #BeamMeUpScotty
Post by Just Wondering
Post by #BeamMeUpScotty
snipped
Maybe just 2. You said you barely got out of high school. And
peanut speaks like he's in junior high school which means he
may have just received a
rudimentary equation in physics involving the **FORCE** of
gravity which he claims is acceleration. What a dummy.
How strong is the **FORCE** of gravity on the surface of
the earth?
You still haven't answered that.
On Earth, gravity gives weight to physical objects and causes the ocean
tides. The force of Earth's gravity is the result of the planets mass
and density – 5.97237 ? 1024 kg (1.31668?1025 lbs) and 5.514 g/cm3,
respectively. This results in Earth having a gravitational strength of
9.8 m/s? close to the surface (also known as 1 g), which naturally
decreases the farther away one is from the surface.
Mass attracts mass, but if there were no external mass and the earth
were the only mass in the universe and it being a steel ball bearing it
would NOT be attracting anything to it, so would it still be that mass
is creating gravity with no external mass for it to react with ?
Can you measure gravity without a mass to show you it is attracting
something, so doesn't gravity require two separate entities with mass
for gravity to exist?
The earth isn't a single mass. It's made up of atoms, which are made up
of protons, neutrons and electrons and other subatomic stuff. Most of
those particles has its own mass. But even considering only atoms, there
are about 1.3 x 10^50 separate gravity sources that make up the earth.
https://www.quora.com/How-many-atoms-are-in-the-earth-and-everything-in-it
Then imagine one atom and whether it creates gravity or does it require
two, do they mutually attract or is one enough to create gravity?
Considering that one mass has no reaction and it requires two to create
the "gravity" then one is ONLY have the equation isn't it?
And when you look at it from all sides it's NOT creating a curve in
space it's creating a hole in the time space wave and gravity is either
a result of the hole or it's NOT there until there is another hole in
the time/space for it to react with.
You can breathe but if you're in a vacuum, breathing is NOT real is it?
there is no breathing there, so with only one atom of mass there would
be no there there for gravity to be there. There would be a half
gravity or a "grav" with no "ity" and unless it's connected it's NOTHING.
If all the universe contained was one fundamental particle, there would
be no one around to test the hypothesis.
The irony being that it wouldn't matter but it would tell you if gravity
is a one sided force of nature. Whether it exists on its own without a
need for a co-dependent force .
If it was possible to create such a situation it wouldn't matter.
Either way, t\The Only Existing Gravity Source (Or Not) wouldn't have
anything to exert a force on.

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